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Dec 31
Fireworks
As 2011 comes to a close, we'll take a look back at some of the big stories of the past year. We paid visits to some big summer music festivals and met some of the stars of tomorrow there. Observed several important composer anniversaries. And brought you memorable performances from concert halls all over the world. Join us as we look back on a great year, and look ahead to what's in store for 2012.
Dec 30
Fireworks
As 2011 comes to a close, we'll take a look back at some of the big stories of the past year. We paid visits to some big summer music festivals and met some of the stars of tomorrow there. Observed several important composer anniversaries. And brought you memorable performances from concert halls all over the world. Join us as we look back on a great year, and look ahead to what's in store for 2012.
Dec 29
Liszt
Looking back on 2011, one of the big stories we covered was the 200th birthday of Franz Liszt. How to sum up Liszt in just a few words? A musician of such immense skill that people whispered he was in league with the devil. A savvy businessman who encouraged those rumors, knowing that there's no such thing as bad press. A reformed rock star with a wild youth and an intensely spiritual old age. In today's show, the late great poet Bill Holm reading his own poem, based on Franz Liszt's "Forgotten Romance."
Dec 28
Charlie Albright
All week long, we're taking a look back at some of our favorite shows from 2011. One of the most interesting people we met was PT Young Artist in Residence, pianist Charlie Albright. He's pursuing a music career with all the passion and energy you might expect, but there's more to him than that. In today's show, he performs the starkly beautiful piano sonata "1.X.1905," by Leos Janacek.
Dec 27
Marlboro Music Festival
From our collection of favorite shows of 2011, we can't overlook a very special festival in rural Vermont. The Marlboro Music Festival, where seasoned veterans and young professionals collaborate side-by-side. Founder Rudolf Serkin called it a "republic of equals." In today's show, festival participants talk about what makes Marlboro so special. And we'll hear a couple of those magical Marlboro performances.
Dec 26
Aspen
As 2011 winds to a close, we'll be taking this week to look back on some of our favorite shows from the past year. In April, host Fred Child visited a special new rehearsal and performance space in Manhattan, the DiMenna Center. Ivan Fischer and the Orchestra of St. Luke's performed a Beethoven Symphony there. And in August, we met an astonishing young violinist, 15-year-old Simone Porter, at the Aspen Festival in Colorado.
Dec 24
18th Century Christmas
On the way for Christmas, 2011, we'll bring you some of the best and brightest holiday performances from all over the globe. From the magnificent concert halls of Europe, to churches large and small, to a warm and inviting Irish pub, it's our annual tour of Christmas Around the World.
Dec 23
18th Century Christmas
On the way for Christmas, 2011, we'll bring you some of the best and brightest holiday performances from all over the globe. From the magnificent concert halls of Europe, to churches large and small, to a warm and inviting Irish pub, it's our annual tour of Christmas Around the World.
Dec 22
snow winter
"To shiver, frozen, amid icy snow in the bitter blast of a horrible wind; to run constantly stamping one's feet; and to feel one's teeth chatter on account of the excessive cold." Antonio Vivaldi wrote those words to describe one of his biggest hits. Winter, from "The Four Seasons," is on the way in today's show, in honor of the winter solstice. Plus, PT's annual celebration of Christmas around the Country.
Dec 21
Yolanda Kondonassis
In today's show, harpist Yolanda Kondonassis, flutist Joshua Smith, and violist Cynthia Phelps sit down with host Fred Child for holiday music and conversation. Kondonassis has made a number of lovely arrangements for the trio, including Greensleeves and two arias by Johann Sebastian Bach. Plus, Andre Jolivet's gentle Christmas meditation, Pastorales de Noel.
Dec 20
Nutcracker
It's Christmas Eve, and there's a big party. Young Clara gets a special present, a nutcracker. At midnight, the Christmas tree grows magically, the Nutcracker turns into a dashing prince, and takes Clara on a tour of his kingdom. It's "The Nutcracker," by Peter Tchaikovsky. We'll hear highlights, from a concert in Montreal.
Dec 19
Handel
Handel's Messiah has been a hit ever since it premiered in Dublin in 1742. So much so that, in early performances, ladies were asked not to wear hoop skirts and men were advised to leave their swords at home, in order to accommodate more concertgoers in the hall. There wasn't a sword or a hoop in sight at a recent Messiah performance in Boston. We'll bring you highlights in today's show.
Dec 17
Bruce Adolphe
Every week on our Piano Puzzler, composer Bruce Adolphe re-writes a familiar tune in the style of a classical composer. We get one of our listeners on the phone to try to guess the tune, and the composer Bruce is mimicking. Is it "Stand by Your Man" in the style of Tchaikovsky? Or maybe "Do Re Mi" in the style of Schoenberg? Play along, see if you can guess the tune and the composer in this week's Piano Puzzler.
Dec 16
Capucon Brothers
One critic said a recent performance by Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic was "like sitting on top of the orchestra world." But the praise wasn't just for the orchestra. Part of what made the concert so electrifying was the two soloists, brothers Renaud and Gautier Capucon. They teamed up for the Brahms Double Concerto for violin and cello. We'll hear it in today's show.
Dec 15
Anonymous 4
The women of Anonymous 4 recently joined host Fred Child for music and conversation in a chilly St. Paul church. Even so, their performances radiated warmth and joy. They tell the story of the Cherry Tree carol, and sing early English and American Christmas carols.
Dec 14
Bruce Adolphe
Every week on our Piano Puzzler, composer Bruce Adolphe re-writes a familiar tune in the style of a classical composer. We get one of our listeners on the phone to try to guess the tune, and the composer Bruce is mimicking. Is it "Stand by Your Man" in the style of Tchaikovsky? Or maybe "Do Re Mi" in the style of Schoenberg? Play along, see if you can guess the tune and the composer in this week's Piano Puzzler.
Dec 13
Classical Guitar
Joaquin Rodrigo's Concerto de Aranjuez is perhaps the most popular guitar concerto of all time. Even if you don't think you know it, there's a good chance you've at least heard the gorgeous, tender slow movement. In today's show, flamenco guitarist Juan Manuel Canizares performs it with the Berlin Philharmonic, from their special 2011 Europa concert.
Dec 12
Franz Joseph Haydn
In today's show, a performance of a Haydn symphony that had a Viennese audience laughing out loud. We'll let you in on the joke, as Daniel Barenboim conducts the Vienna Philharmonic in Haydn's Farewell symphony. Plus, pianist Yuja Wang gives a jaw-dropping performance of music from Stravinsky's ballet "Petrushka" in St. Paul.
Dec 10
Ludwig van Beethoven
"We swear, sword in hand, to die for the republic and for the rights of man." Those words, by French revolutionary writer Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, were the inspiration for Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, according to conductor John Eliot Gardiner. Gardiner leads the Revolutionary and Romantic Orchestra in a stunning performance of Beethoven's Fifth, from a concert three weeks ago at Carnegie Hall.
Dec 9
Cicely Parnas
Cellist Cicely Parnas has been in the studios all week. Today, she wraps up her stay as the newest PT Young Artist in Residence with the final two movements of a Brahms cello sonata. Plus, we'll hear Part II of Mahler's monumental Symphony Number 8, the Symphony of a Thousand, from a concert by the San Francisco Symphony.
Dec 8
Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler's monumental Symphony Number 8 (the Symphony of a Thousand) is ambitious in almost every way. Not just its size (intended for an amassed orchestra and chorus of 1,000 people), but in its emotional and intellectual content. Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony perform part one of the Symphony of a Thousand in today's show. Look for part two tomorrow.
Dec 7
Mariss Jansons
Mariss Jansons got his conducting start early in life. We'll hear the story of how he graduated from conducting paper clips and erasers, to leading the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, once voted the top orchestra in the world. Today, they team up for Maurice Ravel's ravishing Suite No. 2 from the ballet "Daphnis and Chloe."
Dec 6
Ludwig van Beethoven
"We swear, sword in hand, to die for the republic and for the rights of man." Those words, by French revolutionary writer Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, were the inspiration for Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, according to conductor John Eliot Gardiner. Gardiner leads the Revolutionary and Romantic Orchestra in a stunning performance of Beethoven's Fifth, from a concert three weeks ago at Carnegie Hall.
Dec 5
Cicely Parnas
PT's newest Young Artist in Residence is cellist Cicely Parnas. She's in her first year at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. Every day this week, she joins host Fred Child in the PT studios for music and conversation. Today, Cicely talks about her new cello, and plays a Debussy sonata with accompanist Kati Gleiser.
Dec 3
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg
Like plenty of other great ideas, at first glance, it might leave you scratching your head a bit. Start with an old chestnut by Antonio Vivaldi, the Four Seasons. And see it through an entirely different lens, the sultry, smoky Argentinian tango. Is that really such a good idea? Well, yes. Violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg plays Astor Piazzolla's Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, from a concert in San Francisco.
Dec 2
Christopher Theofanidis
Johann Sebastian Bach's music is almost like another element, another building block in the chemistry of the world. Lots of artists have thrown a pinch or two of Bach into the fire and come up with some interesting new alloy. Count Christopher Theofanidis among them. We'll hear his new work, "Muse," along with Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, the piece that inspired it.
Dec 1
Faun
Claude Debussy's faun didn't leave a day-planner behind, so the rest of his day was a mystery. But Debussy captured a few hours of it in one of the most memorable pieces ever. It's music that's delicate and lush and shimmering, all at once. In today's show, the Cleveland Orchestra plays Debussy's "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun," on tour in Lucerne, Switzerland.